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power up (D)

Corita%20Kent%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20power%20up%20%28B%29%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201965%2C%20color%20screenprint%20on%20Pellon%2C%20The%20Vivian%20and%20Gordon%20Gilkey%20Graphic%20Arts%20Collection%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20Corita%20Art%20Center%2C%20Immaculate%20Heart%20Community%2C%20Los%20Angeles%2C%20CA%2C%2086.13.568
Corita Kent, power up (B), 1965, color screenprint on Pellon, The Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Graphic Arts Collection, © Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA, 86.13.568

Corita%20Kent%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20power%20up%20%28D%29%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201965%2C%20color%20screenprint%20on%20Pellon%2C%20The%20Vivian%20and%20Gordon%20Gilkey%20Graphic%20Arts%20Collection%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20Corita%20Art%20Center%2C%20Immaculate%20Heart%20Community%2C%20Los%20Angeles%2C%20CA%2C%2091.84.291

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Details
Title

power up (D)

Artist

Corita Kent (American, 1918-1986)

Date

1965

Medium

color screenprint on Pellon

Edition

edition of 100

Catalogue Raisonné

CAC 65-15

Dimensions (H x W x D)

28 7/8 in x 35 1/8 in

Inscriptions & Markings

signature: Sister Mary Corita, black ink, lower right

Collection Area

Graphic Arts

Category

Prints

Object Type

stencil print

Culture

American

Credit Line

The Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Graphic Arts Collection

Accession Number

91.84.291

Copyright

© Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA

Terms

screen printing

screen prints

Description

Corita Kent's signature style is marked by a playful combination of sources in the service of the common good, as seen in this iconic work. Here Kent borrowed the slogan of Richfield Oil Corporation and married it to a sermon by activist priest Daniel Berrigan. Berrigan's text focuses on the power of bread—both literally as a foodstuff and metaphorically as a social agent and the mystical body of Christ, an outlook that Kent shared. As Kent explained, "POWER UP…stops being only a sign about gasoline and starts talking about bread that gives man's heart strength. The Word powers up and the Eucharist powers up."

Kent, who was motivated by a deeply held belief in social justice, often turned to food as a symbol for caring for the poor. This motif—and its many meanings as physical and spiritual sustenance—can be found in a number of her screenprints from the 1960s.

History
Exhibitions

2016 Corita Kent: Spiritual Pop Portland Art Museum

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